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E14AN3 Version Licence LCER Semestre 1 (P. Dorval)
ANNEE 2012 – 2013
E14AN3
LICENCE 1 LCER ANGLAIS
VERSION
Semestre 1
FASCICULE
P. DORVAL
1
E14AN3 Version Licence LCER Semestre 1 (P. Dorval)
VERSION 1
E14 AN3 (4 ECTS)
Coordination : Pascal ROBERT
ORGANISATION
L’enseignement de la version en L1 est conçu en deux temps :
- un premier semestre (E14 AN3) méthodologique axé sur l’apprentissage des méthodes et des
procédés de traduction pour permettre un travail réflexif à la fois sur la langue source et la
langue d’arrivée, cet apprentissage se poursuivant par une initiation à la traduction en continu.
un second semestre (E24 AN3) de traduction en continu (littéraire et journalistique) sur des
supports variés, qui mettra systématiquement en pratique les connaissances acquises au S1. Ce
semestre intègre le début de l’acquisition du vocabulaire à partir d’un manuel, qui se poursuivra
en L2 et L3.
DESCRIPTIF
- Initiation à la théorie de la traduction et entraînement à la pratique à partir de textes courts
d'anglais britannique et américain contemporain (littéraires et journalistiques). Le semestre sera
consacré à une réflexion sur les grands principes de la traduction et sur les principales
difficultés du passage de l'anglais au français. Le travail se fera à partir d'exercices divers.
- L’enseignement comporte 1h30 hebdomadaire de travaux dirigés donnant lieu à une préparation
écrite obligatoire par semaine. Les travaux rendus par les étudiants pondèreront la moyenne
obtenue aux trois contrôles (voir ci-dessous les Modalités de contrôle).
OUVRAGE NÉCESSAIRE
Un dictionnaire unilingue anglais, par exemple le Collins Cobuild Dictionary of the English Language
ou le Random House Dictionary of the English Language, College Edition.
OUVRAGES CONSEILLÉS
1. dictionnaire bilingue : Robert-Collins.
2. dictionnaire français : Le Petit Robert.
3. grammaire française : Bescherelle I Conjugaisons et III Grammaire (Paris : Hatier)
ou BLED, Cours supérieur d'orthographe, Hachette Supérieur (Paris : Hachette).
4. dictionnaire des synonymes : Larousse, Hachette ou Paul Rouaix, Dictionnaire des
idées suggérées par les mots. Trouver le mot juste (Paris : Livre de Poche, 1989).
5. exercices sur la théorie de la traduction :
- Ballard Michel. La traduction de l’anglais au français. 2e édition (Collection
Cursus).
Paris : Armand Colin.
- Grellet Françoise. Initiation à la version anglaise : The Word against the Word.
(Collection Hachette Supérieur) Paris : Hachette, 2006.
- Grellet Françoise. Apprendre à traduire. Nancy : Presses Universitaires de Nancy,
1991.
MODALITÉS DE CONTRÔLE DES CONNAISSANCES
Première évaluation :
Contrôle continu
- Exercice de méthodologie : 30 min (coeff. 1)
- Exercice de méthodologie : 30 min (coeff. 1)
- Version avec commentaire des procédés de traduction : 1h30 (coeff. 2)
2
E14AN3 Version Licence LCER Semestre 1 (P. Dorval)
3
Dispensés d’assiduité
- Version écrite avec commentaire des procédés de traduction : 1h30 (coeff.1)
Seconde évaluation (CC& DA)
- Version écrite avec commentaire des procédés de traduction : 1h30 (coeff.1)
Calendrier détaillé indicatif
1. Semaine du 10 septembre : Généralités (Que traduire ? Emploi des majuscules,
Différences orthographiques)
2. Semaine du 17 septembre : Généralités (Ponctuation-typographie, Coloration +
Etoffement 1)
3. Semaine du 24 septembre : Etoffement 2
4. Semaine du 01 octobre : Transposition 1
5. Semaine du 08 octobre : Transposition 2
6. Semaine du 15 octobre : Texte 1
7. Semaine du 22 octobre : Modulation 1 + Partiel 1 : exercices de méthodologie 30 min.
(coeff. 1)
Vacances de Toussaint
8. Semaine du 05 novembre : Corrigé partiel 1 + Modulation 2
9. Semaine du 12 novembre : Equivalence 1
10. Semaine du 19 novembre : Equivalence 2 + Partiel 2 : exercices de méthodologie
30 min. (coeff. 1)
11. Semaine du 26 novembre : Corrigé partiel 2 + Insistance + Texte 2
12. Semaine du 03 décembre : Texte 3
13. Semaine du 10 décembre : Partiel 3 final version : 1h30 (coeff. 2)
P.S. Ce calendrier est purement indicatif ; nous serons sans doute amenés à nous décaler.
E14AN3 Version Licence LCER Semestre 1 (P. Dorval)
4
A. VERSION
1. PONCTUATION - TYPOGRAPHIE
Ponctuation du dialogue
“I’m retiring, Scobie,” the Commissioner said,
“after this tour.”
“I know.”
“I suppose everyone knows.” (G. Greene)
— Je prends ma retraite après cette tournée,
Scobie, dit le Directeur.
— Je le sais.
— Je suppose que tout le monde le sait.
‘This has been a wonderful day!’ said he as the
Rat shoved off and took to the skulls again. ‘Do you
know, I’ve never been in a boat before in all my life.'
‘What?’ cried the Rat, open-mouthed. ‘Never been
in a — you never — well, I — what have you been
doing then?
‘Is it so nice as all that?’ asked the Mole shyly,
though he was quite prepared to believe it as […]
(Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows,
1908)
«Quelle merveilleuse journée, dit-il, tandis que Rat
s’écartait de la rive et prenait ses avirons. Vous savez,
c’est la première fois que je vais en bateau.
— Quoi ? s’écria Rat, bouche bée. Jamais été…
vous n’avez jamais… mais alors… qu’est-ce que vous
avez fait jusqu’ici ?
— C’est si agréable que cela ?» demanda
timidement Taupe, tout disposé à le croire […]
(Traduction de J. Parsons)
La virgule
1) I wasn’t alone. My two cousins, Helen and Joan, came with me.
2) I wasn’t alone. My two cousins, Helen and Joan came with me.
3) She was surprisingly excited by the news
4) She was, surprisingly, excited by the news
5) I’ll convince those who are afraid to go.
6) I’ll convince those who are afraid, to go.
7) The story he told us was a pack of lies
8) The story, he told us, was a pack of lies.
9) My aunt, who was at the theatre, is a painter.
10) My aunt who was at the theatre is a painter.
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Les italiques
“Have you read Butler’s Middlemarch?”
“No, George Eliot wrote Middlemarch.”
2. COLORATION
Tommy said gloomily:
“This war is hell.”
“It’s bad enough having a war,” said Tuppence, “but not being allowed to do anything in it
just puts the lid on.”
Tommy said consolingly:
“Well, at anyrate Deborah has got a job.”
Deborah’s mother said:
“Oh, she’s all right. I expect she’s good at it, too. But I still think, Tommy, that I could hold
my own with Deborah.”
Tommy grinned.
“She wouldn’t thing so.”
Tuppence said:
“Daughters can be very trying. Especially when they will be so kind to you.”
Tommy murmured:
“The way young Derek makes allowances for me is sometimes rather hard to bear. That ‘poor
old Dad’ look in his eye.”
“In fact, said Tuppence, “our children, although quite adorable, are also quite maddening.”
[…]
“I suppose,” said Tommy thoughtfully, “that it’s always hard for people themselves to realise
that they are getting middle-aged and past doing things.”
(Agatha Christie, N or M ?)
3. ETOFFEMENT
1.
Off the motorway, new problems arise for the motorist.
2.
I picked up a magazine from the stack on the table.
3.
He stopped at the desk for his mail.
4.
He insisted on a taxi.
5.
She sang to the violin.
E14AN3 Version Licence LCER Semestre 1 (P. Dorval)
6.
Some children work to pop music.
7.
He was married with children.
8.
I myself believe that the evidence of God lies primarily in inner personal experiences.
9.
Passengers to New York are asked to make their presence known.
10.
… according to a report in European Policy Analyst.
11.
The charge against him.
12.
The women around her were furious.
13.
I saw him from where I was.
14.
He stopped at the supermarket for 2 pints of milk.
15.
... programs by private enterprise [...] to improve the quality of work.
16.
There was a hole for a window.
17.
You can reach his room through the study.
18.
The people on the course will have to book their own hotels.
19.
He drew back with a yell of fright.
20.
She left the child with her aunt.
21.
You will endeavour to master all the concepts presented in the course. To achieve this, your
full commitment will be required.
22.
She muses on why she can’t endure...
23.
It has to do with why you did not come.
24.
He insisted that the Prime Minister had been snubbed.
25.
His sense of her inferiority.
26.
Lady Longford admits to a youthful enthusiasm for a boy who stayed in his bed all day.
27.
We should be aware of and fight against such fads.
28.
In the U.S. a man is judged by, and lives for, material gain.
29.
6
Blyk, which is aiming for the 16- to 24-year-old market, is also understood to be close to a
deal with mobile phone operator Orange to run the service over its network.
30.
Wall Street’s panic surprised everybody.
31.
Mrs Thatcher’s desire for tight limits on farm spending.
32.
Kerry’s probable victory in this week’s Connecticut primary.
33.
To my surprise.
34.
"You are Lauren Smith, aren't you?"
35.
in Middleport, N. Y.
36.
Marco Schall, 24.
37.
Fast food tempts the hurried.
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38.
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The big overseas economies.
39.
[They are also a microcosm of the challenges many emerging markets are facing in the current
turmoil, underscoring the vulnerability of] even larger developing economies like South Korea
[to sudden tremors in global finance].
40.
The government must urgently (transposition) begin improvements to make Britain's 25m
homes more energy efficient, a report says today.
41.
The problem cannot be solved overnight.
42.
The Times was first published in 1785 as the Daily Universal Register.
43.
Outraged Japan fails to overturn whale ban.
44.
Murder can't be ruled out.
4. TRANSPOSITION
A] Substantif / verbe
1.
I threatened him with dismissal.
2.
This was no occasion for joy.
3.
Provision for the care of the elderly should be compulsory.
4.
He’s angry because I refused him the loan of my car.
5.
The assumption is that…
6.
For sale.
7.
We are confident of success.
8.
200 others are still waiting evacuation in the French embassy in Phnom Penh.
9.
The fear among scientists is that increasing temperatures will work to reduce this effect.
B] Adjectif / substantif
10.
As he got older, he became less saturnine.
11.
I met him in late autumn.
12.
We need a new French teacher.
13.
They were irritatingly polite.
14.
The Dow Jones also fell sharply, losing 283 points by early afternoon in New York.
15.
16.
The Chinese government announced a series of measures late Wednesday night to bolster real
estate prices [...] effective Nov. 1.
The speculative property boom.
E14AN3 Version Licence LCER Semestre 1 (P. Dorval)
17.
Medical students.
18.
200 others are still waiting evacuation in the French embassy in Phnom Penh.
19.
… the skyrocketing price of oil in the last two years…
20.
Higher revenue will not eliminate all causes of social discontent.
21.
Rising imports should mean cheaper gas in the 1990s.
22.
Lower production costs will improve the margins on the company’s products.
23.
That dates back to his early teens.
24.
The Senate voted in favour of the plan late on Wednesday.
25.
He is prejudiced against women.
26.
He has been unemployed since 2007.
8
C] Adverbe / verbe
27.
But I simply went out to get my cardigan.
28.
When he finally left the office, it was dark .
29.
In spite of many efforts, the unemployment figures have grown steadily worse.
30.
He successfully dealt with the situation.
31.
He just shrugged.
32.
When I first became interested in health foods, I believed that the soybean was a “miracle
food.”
33.
Royal Bank of Scotland is reportedly on the verge of cutting 3,000 jobs as it tries to survive
the economic downturn.
34.
He nearly got arrested.
35.
We soon realized that…
36.
He merely nodded.
37.
He almost fell.
38.
Orange refused to comment, saying only that it was always on the lookout for partners.
39.
He is admittedly a great writer.
40.
‘I never drink anything for luncheon,’ she said.
41.
‘Neither do I,’ I answered promptly.
42.
Unemployment is still high on the agenda of the government.
D] Préposition / verbe ou participe passé
43.
She came for some glasses.
44.
The bus stopped for a group of Indian women with baskets.
45.
It’s a quotation from Shakespeare.
46.
There were three men in the room, in dinner-jackets and top hats.
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E] Adjectif / proposition relative
47.
We’re having very unseasonable weather.
48.
The resultant financial benefits will be very high.
49.
When we arrived we found everything unprepared.
50.
The cases unprovided for by the rule will have to be considered.
F] Verbe / substantif
51.
What politicians do…
52.
Yield
53.
Before the match started…
54.
Look for volatility to pick up towards the end of the trading day.
55.
London market in turmoil after US bail-out fails.
56.
He cried after they left.
57.
I don't think we can plausibly say what's causing it.
G] Verbe / préposition
58.
The British Premier thinks that...
59.
Bush says consequences of financial crisis 'will get worse every day if we do not act'.
60.
The government must urgently begin improvements to make Britain's 25m homes more energy
efficient, a report says today.
H] Participe passé / substantif
61.
Improved tax collection
62.
Improved lifestyle
63.
For the impoverished populations of Venezuela or Nigeria, and perhaps in the future for the
people of Iraq, increased government spending.
64.
Reduced libido
65.
Reduced levels of the additive will not adversely affect taste or quality.
I] Adjectif / adverbe
66.
… have generated sufficient interest…
67.
Investment bankers […] and ICE are understood to have held recent discussions.
68.
He spoke fluent French.
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J] Adjectif / verbe
69.
She’s weight-conscious.
K] Adjectif / participe présent
70.
People over the age of 40.
L] Préposition / verbe
71.
Driving through the city.
72.
She hurried into the church.
73.
A bird hopped into the room.
74.
Asian markets in dramatic rebound.
75.
We floundered along in the mud.
76.
He strode into the house.
M] Adverbe / substantif
45.
She spoke well of him.
N] Adverbe / adjectif
79.
80.
The government must urgently begin improvements to make Britain's 25m homes more
energy efficient, a report says today.
The Japanese discuss these incidents, curiously enough, without much anger.
O] Substantif / adjectif
81.
82.
The prevailing wisdom is that women in menopause lack estrogen, and phyto-estrogen
replenish the body with estrogen.
Endometriosis affects personal life, social life and career.
P] Double transposition
83.
Disappointingly obvious.
84.
Outstandingly good.
85.
She felt sure he would come.
Q] Le chassé-croisé (cf. section L)
86.
She hobbled upstairs.
E14AN3 Version Licence LCER Semestre 1 (P. Dorval)
87.
Upon hearing the phone, she ran out of the bedroom.
88.
The boy crawled in.
89.
He groped his way across the room.
90.
Don’t worry, it’ll wash out.
91.
He flung the door open.
92.
He worked himself to death.
93.
The fish swam across the pond.
94.
… then he walked out of his office.
5. MODULATION / ADAPTATION
1.
Thanks to the Court decision, he will be given a maintenance grant.
Changement de point de vue
2.
She had drenched her skirt from the knees down.
3.
He was knee-deep in water.
4.
Don’t call down the stairs ! Come down!
5.
I locked myself out of the car yesterday. I never felt so stupid in my life !
6.
I miss him.
7.
Anxiety keeps their heads bowed /αυ/.
Concret/abstrait
8.
He’s always using words a yard long.
9.
He escaped a similar fate by a hair’s breadth.
10.
It’s time someone taught him he isn’t the only pebble on the beach.
11.
They’ve got plenty of brains in that family.
12.
The second hand
13.
The ins and outs
Contraire négativé ou double contraire
14.
She’s rather plain.
15.
(At the end of a visit) Remember the guide !
11
E14AN3 Version Licence LCER Semestre 1 (P. Dorval)
16.
Only cads do this ! (cad : goujat, mufle)
17.
Hang on ! (au téléphone)
18.
No vacancies
19.
It was nowhere near spring yet.
20.
But using canthaxanthin carries a risk.
21.
The houses were all dark.
22.
He could not remember a time before he had loved Ellie.
Partie pour le tout ou partie pour une autre
23.
There he was at his desk, his head bent over his work.
24.
The hounds were giving tongue.
25.
The food is good in this restaurant.
26.
Frogs’ legs
27.
The keyhole
28.
A mountain bike
29.
The developing world
30.
Considering his years
Passif/actif
31.
Is the internet as black as it is painted ?
32.
He was made a great fuss of.
Adjectif possessif/article défini
33.
They all had their pipes in their mouths.
34.
They went off with their hats under their arms.
35.
His back was turned toward me.
36.
He straightened his shoulders.
37.
I’ve hurt my shoulder.
Article indéfini/article défini
38.
She has a headache.
12
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13
Pluriel/singulier
39.
The best years of our lives
40.
They all had their pipes in their mouths.
41.
Dairy produce can also cause a runny nose.
42.
They went off with their hats under their arms.
43.
On Saturday evenings, when we went to see him, he would be playing the piano while
waiting for us.
Impératif/infinitif
44.
Melt the margarine in a pan.
Participe passé/infinitif
45.
Reduced levels of the additive will not adversely affect taste or quality (relève également de la
transposition).
Perceptions sensorielles; origines géographiques; une comparaison pour une autre
46.
A goldfish
47.
Pea-green
48.
A Chinese lantern
49.
Indian ink
50.
A pony-tail
Divers
51.
For the first time ever
52.
Instant coffee
53.
To have a lot on one’s hands.
54.
A dishwasher
55.
I’ve got her under my skin!
56.
Lost and found
Adaptation
57.
We walk 6 or 7 miles a day.
58.
We have only a few yards left of that material.
59.
(in a passport) Height : 5ft 3ins.
60.
The room was about 8 feet high.
E14AN3 Version Licence LCER Semestre 1 (P. Dorval)
61.
Coleman was not much over five eight, if that.
62.
I was reading a biography of an actor whose height was given as 6’3’’.
14
63.
The speed limit in towns and built-up areas is normally 30 mph although in some areas it may
be 20 mph.
64.
We had over a foot of snow this morning. How much did you have? – Oh, we had about six
inches.
65.
The post-office is about a hundred yards down this road on the left.
66.
He stopped at the supermarket for 2 pints of milk.
67.
We have dozens of world-class companies.
6. EQUIVALENCE
1.
(When pouring a drink) "Say when !"
2.
No parking beyond the yellow line
3.
Employees only
4.
No U-turns
5.
Keep out of the reach of children
6.
Over my dead body !
7.
Medium rare, please.
8.
You’re welcome.
9.
Don’t mention it.
10.
It’s a dead cert**
11.
Behave yourself!
12.
Have you heard the latest?
13.
Hold on !
14.
It’s an absolute cinch! **
15.
What’s up?
16.
Mind your own business!
17.
Ouch!
18.
Oh dear!
19.
Great!
20.
No kidding?
21.
Wet paint
E14AN3 Version Licence LCER Semestre 1 (P. Dorval)
22.
Senior citizens
23.
It is raining cats and dogs* = it is raining buckets*.
24.
Trade buyers have been as rare as hen’s teeth.
25.
Like a bull in a china shop.
26.
Money burned his pockets.
27.
To give/make a V-sign.
28.
Blend 1 tsp white truffle paste and 15 cc of brandy.
29.
15
He wouldn’t set the Thames on fire = He'll never set the Thames on fire = He’s not a rocket
scientist.
30.
Before you could say Jack Robinson = Before you could say knife.
31.
If you reach for margarine because you want to avoid the saturated fat in butter, think again.
32.
She is a bookworm.
33.
Tit for tat.
34.
Still waters run deep.
35.
When pigs fly
36.
To kill two birds with one stone.
37.
Birds of a feather flock together.
38.
Nothing ventured, nothing gained
39.
The proof of the pudding is in the eating.
40.
Spare (refrain from using, épargner) the rod (trique) and spoil (pourrir / gâter) the child.
41.
Don’t teach your granny how to suck eggs.
42.
I never rains but it pours.
43.
What is borne in the bone cannot come out of the flesh.
44.
Once a thief, always a thief.
45.
God helps those who help themselves.
46.
Once bitten, twice shy.
47.
Don’t count your chickens before they are hatched (éclos).
48.
Might is right.
49.
Out of sight, out of mind.
50.
It's a small world.
51.
There are plenty of fish in the sea.
52.
Forewarned is forearmed.
53.
Better be safe than sorry.
54.
To the best of my knowledge.
55.
Adding insult to injury, there is no food more subjected to the dangerous onslaught of
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16
biotechnology than the soybean.
7. INSISTANCE
1.
This isn’t what I meant at all.
2.
He could not possibly have done it.
3.
I did feel that something was wrong.
4.
He is very intelligent.
5.
I know who phoned!
6.
I know!
7.
It’s very interesting.
8.
She is not such a very young girl.
9.
I like the book, but I hated the film.
10.
These people get on my nerves.
11.
We were told it was really a Hogarth print.
12.
‘No, of course not.’ I felt chastened. I also felt exhilarated. My letters. My letters. Winterton
was planning to let me publish them, wasn’t he?
13.
‘I see you’re in the habit of eating a heavy luncheon. I’m sure it’s a mistake. Why don’t you
follow my example and just eat one thing? I’m sure you’d feel ever so much better for it.’ ‘I am
only going to eat one thing,’ I said, as the waiter came again with the bill of fare…
14.
‘I do thank you for stopping and not running poor Nellie [a hen] over’
15.
‘But I do wish you wouldn’t whisper, Constantia.’
16.
“Oh, Sir Hugo,” she mumbled, “I do beg your pardon. I must have dropped off!”
17.
‘Look here, Stevens, have there been any — well — signs at all?
18.
‘What happens within this house after may have considerable repercussions.’
‘Yes, Sir.’
‘I mean considerable repercussions.”
19.
‘Grace! — don’t you feel there’s — something unspoken between us?’
20.
‘Be STILL! Someone can hear you!’
21.
22.
“No, it’s true, Sir Hugo,” he said, in very soft, very silky tones — and then he reached out a
hand, and put it on my shoulder!
‘Perhaps you do not trust women,’ I said. ‘That is your right.’
I have trusted women—’ she began, and did not finish. Then ‘That did harm. Great harm.’
E14AN3 Version Licence LCER Semestre 1 (P. Dorval)
8. TEXTE N°1
The first symptoms of Samuel Bemergy’s mysterious sickness were diarrhea and
lip ulcers. Next came a clouding of his vision and uncontrollable tremors in his arms and
legs. “I could hardly hold on to anything, and I could hardly walk,” Bemergy recalls. “I
thought I had had it.” Bermergy, who owns a grocery store in the Amazon gold-mining
town of Itaituba, sought help from local doctors, but they were mystified. Finally, he
flew to Sao Paulo to consult two specialists. Their diagnosis: acute mercury poisoning,
apparently caused by eating contaminated fish from the Tapajos River.
That was seven years ago, at the height of a frenzied gold rush in the Amazon
when no one, least of all the Brazilian government, paid attention to possible
environmental consequen-ces. Only lately has it become clear that the prospectors, who
use mercury to separate out the gold particles dredged from riverbeds, have not only
disfigured the rain forest and muddied the rivers, but poisoned the waters as well. While
scientists are divided about the ultimate impact—research so far has been fragmentary,
and not enough is known about the process by which mercury gets into the food chain—
there is agreement that hundreds of thousands of people living in a region the size of
Europe may be at risk. “What we are facing is a silent environmental tragedy,” says Dr
Geraldo Guimaraes, a biochemist at the Center for Tropical Medicine in Belem. “Ninety
percent of the diet of river dwellers is fish. These people are slowly being poisoned. We
have to sound alert. At stake is the future of generations.”
9. TEXTE N°2
'You want a meal,' she said. She had read the whole page like so many women do
at a glance, even to the footnote of his thin shoes. He made a gesture which might have
been deprecation or acceptance. She said, 'We haven’t much in the house. You know
how things are. It would be easier to give you money.'
He said, 'I’ve got money… three hundred francs.'
She said, 'You’d better come in. Make as little dirt as you can. I’ve been scrubbing
these steps.'
'I’ll take off my shoes,' he said humbly, and he followed her in, feeling the parquet
floor cold under his socks. Everything had changed a little for the worse: there was no
question but that the house had been surrendered to strangers: the big mirror had been
taken down and left an ugly patch on the wall: the tallboy had been shifted, a chair had
gone: the steel engraving of a naval engagement off Brest had been hung in a new
place―tastelessly he thought; He looked in vain for a photograph of his father, and
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exclaimed suddenly, furiously, 'Where’s…?'
'Where’s what?'
He checked himself. 'Your mother,' he said.
She turned round and looked at him as though she had missed something on the
first reading. 'How do you know about my mother?'
'Janvier told me.'
'Who’s Janvier? I don't know any Janvier.'
'Your brother,' he said. 'We used to call him that in the prison.'
'You were with him there?'
'Yes.'
He was to learn in time that she never quite did the expected thing: he had
imagined that now she would call her mother, but instead she laid her hand on his arm
and said, 'Don’t speak so loud.' She expained, 'My mother doesn’t know.'
Graham Greene, The Tenth Man (1944)
10. TEXTE N°3
‘Your father feeling better now, Stevens?’
‘I’m glad to say he has made a full recovery, sir.’
‘Jolly pleased to hear that. Jolly pleased.’
‘Thank you, sir.’
‘Look here, Stevens, have there been any — well — signs at all? I mean signs to tell us your
father may be wishing his burden lightened somewhat? Apart from this business of falling, I mean.’
‘As I say, sir, my father appears to have made a full recovery and I believe he is still a person
of considerable dependability. It is true one or two errors have been noticeable recently in the
discharging of his duties, but these are in every case very trivial in nature.’
‘But none of us wish to see anything of that sort happen ever again, do we? I mean, your
father collapsing and all that.’
‘Indeed not, sir.’
‘And of course, if it can happen out on the lawn, it could happen anywhere. And at any time.’
‘Yes, sir.’
‘It could happen, say, during dinner while your father was waiting at table.’
‘It is possible, sir.’
‘Look here, Stevens, the first of the delegates will be arriving here in less than a fortnight.’
‘We are well prepared, sir.’
‘What happens within this house after that may have considerable repercussions.’
‘Yes, sir.’
‘I mean considerable repercussions. On the whole course Europe is taking. In view of the
persons who will be present, I do not think I exaggerate.’
‘No, sir.’
‘Hardly the time for taking on avoidable hazards.’
‘Indeed not, sir.’
‘Look here, Stevens, there’s no question of your father leaving us. You’re simply being asked
to reconsider his duties.’ And it was then, I believe, that his lordship said as he looked down again
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into his volume and awkwardly fingered an entry: ‘These errors may be trivial in themselves,
Stevens, but you must yourself realize their larger significance. Your father’s days of dependability
are now passing. He must not be asked to perform tasks in any area where an error may jeopardize
the success of the forthcoming conference.’
‘Indeed not, sir. I fully understand.’
‘Good. I’ll leave you to think about it then, Stevens.’
Kazuo ISHIGURO, Remains of the Day (1989)
Ouvrages de référence utilisés:
Grellet, Françoise, Introduction à la version anglaise. The word against the word, Paris,
Hachette, 1985-93.
Chuquet, Hélène et Michel Paillard, Approche linguistique des problèmes de traduction
anglais-français, Paris, Ophrys, 1987.
Petton, André, Pratique de la version anglaise pour la préparation au DEUG et aux concours,
Rennes, Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2000.
Darbelnet, J. et J. P. Vinay, Stylistique comparée du français et de l'anglais, Paris, Didier,
1977 (1958)
Le Grand Robert et Collins. Dictionnaire bilingue français-anglais / anglais-français, Le
Robert, 2008.
P.S. Ces ouvrages sont régulièrement réimprimés et sont encore disponibles.
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