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AFRICAN ORGANISATION FOR RESEARCH AND TRAINING IN CANCER
AORTIC NEWS
The Pulse of Cancer
Care in Africa
Volume 14, Issue 14
March 2009
AORTIC is dedicated
to the promotion
of cancer control
in Africa
.
Inside this issue:
World Cancer Day— 2
4th February 2009
I Love My Healthy
Active Lifestyle
3—4
Tanzania Oncology
Nursing
5—6
Breast Cancer Systemic Therapy
7
Walking on Onions— 8—
Surviving Ovarian
10
Cancer
Egypt—Rising Costs
of Care
11
Cancer in Africa
Needs a Local Approach
12—
13
Psycho-Social Oncology Care in Africa?
14
Five Country Initiative
15
Maximise Life with
the Max Foundation
Art Project
16
Tobacco Control
Training Workshop
17
Cancer Care Treatment in Developing
Countries
FROM THE EDITOR
Dear Readers,
With the AORTIC 2009 conference a mere
7 months away
we
encourage
you to register
online if you have not already
done so. We have a very exciting scientific programme lined
up for our conference not the
least of which includes 2 live
surgical workshops.
The programme and on-line registration
information is available on our
conference
website
at
www.aortic2009.org. To qualify
for reduced conference registration fees for the AORTIC 2009
conference we propose you become a member of AORTIC. In-
formation on how to become a
member is available on our official website at www.aortic.org
(Africa site section) or e-mail
me at [email protected] and
I will send you the necessary
documentation. In the following
issues leading up to the AORTIC
2009 conference we will be featuring articles that focus on East
Africa and we hope you find
these informative and helpful.
As always you are most welcome to share your thoughts
with us which you can send to
me at [email protected]
I
look forward to hearing from
you!
Belmira Rodrigues
WORLD CANCER DAY—4TH FEBRUARY
COMPETITION
To commemorate World Cancer Day, AORTIC held a competition for
a slogan to be written to raise awareness about cancer in Africa.
We are pleased to announce that the overall winner is Clare
Manicom with her winning entry:
Cancer—Talk about it, Treat it, Survive!
Congratulations Clare, you have won free AORTIC membership for 1
18— year!
19
Cancer Institute Pro- 20
file
Conferences
21—
25
Books
26—
CONTACT:
AORTIC
P O BOX 186
RONDEBOSCH
7701
SOUTH AFRICA
Tel: +27 21 689-5359
Fax: +27 21 689-5350
E-Mail: [email protected]
Website: www.aortic.org
PAGE 2
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 4, NUMBER 14
WORLD CANCER DAY— 4TH FEBRUARY 2008
On World Cancer Day, the International Union Against Cancer
(UICC) launched “I love my healthy active childhood”, the second
full-year theme in their “Today’s children, tomorrow’s world” cancer prevention campaign.
World Cancer Day 2009 marked the start of a year-long campaign,
where the UICC will work with parents, teachers and decisionmakers around the world to encourage kids to eat a healthy diet,
be physically active and maintain a healthy body weight.
For more information about World Cancer Day and the World
Cancer Campaign, please contact the UICC at: [email protected]
REPORT ISSUED ON WORLD CANCER DAY
The new report issued on World Cancer Day
(4 Feb) that showed that deaths attributed
to cancer in developing countries have increased to alarming levels should be a wake
up call for Africa to address meaningfully this
devastating chronic disease and include cancer firmly on the African health agenda.
At the African Organisation for Research and
Training in Cancer (AORTIC), we are dedicated to supporting the management of
training programs in oncology for health care
workers, dealing with the challenges of creating cancer control and prevention programs, and raising public awareness of cancer in Africa.
But so much more needs to
be done.
CANCER
FACTS!
While resources are often scarce, this report should underscore for all of us that
addressing cancer cannot be ignored in developing nations. We need to take action,
internationally in Africa and worldwide, to
find ways to increase access to cancer prevention, management and treatment programs and to enhance patient understanding of this disease.
We simply cannot afford to not address the
urgent and devastating rise in cancer
prevalence and deaths in Africa.
Professor Lynette Denny
Secretary Treasurer , AORTIC
Cancer affects everyone – the young and old, the rich and poor, men,
women and children – and represents a tremendous burden on patients, families and societies.
Cancer is one of the leading causes
particularly in developing countries.
of
death
in
the
world,
Yet,
many of these deaths can be avoided. Over 30% of all cancers can be prevented.
Others can be detected early, treated and cured. Even with late stage cancer, the suffering
of patients can be relieved with good palliative care.
- WHO
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 3
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 4, NUMBER 14
"I LOVE MY HEALTHY ACTIVE CHILDHOOD”
Walk Program News
The "I LOVE MY HEALTHY ACTIVE CHILDHOOD” walk program in support of World
Cancer Day and World Childhood Cancer
Day was held on Sunday, February 15,
2009 at Meskel Square, in Addis Ababa,
Ethiopia. Nearly one thousand people of
whom half of them were young students
from various schools in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia took part. 800 T-shirts were printed for
the day along with banners and posters.
Mr. Tsegaye Bedane representing the Ministry of Health of the Federal Democratic
Republic of Ethiopia was a Guest of Honour.
Representatives from different Government
and Non-Government Offices including the
WHO, Country Office here in Ethiopia also
took part and actively participated in the
program. Briefing on cancer in general and
Childhood Cancer
in particular by Dr.
Bogale Solomon, the only Senior Oncologist
here in Ethiopia and question and answers
program on cancer and childhood cancer
that followed afterwards helped to transform the program into one of the most inspirational and educational events of its
kind.
One of the two Departments responsible for
cancer treatment in the Black Lion Hospital,
the only cancer treating hospital in Ethiopia,
is the Pediatric Department, which treats
children under the age of 12. The Department is responsible for all kinds of treatment, including cancer. The two wards under the Department have no dedicated
rooms intended for cancer and have no permanent specialists, instead the treatment is
supervised by undergraduate and postgraduate students of the Medical Faculty of
the Addis Ababa University. Both wards do
not have sufficient treatment options and
medicines available. Due to these problems
and constraints, the paediatric wards of the
hospital are in a very bad condition.
With this meager facility and medical support provision, the number of patients is increasing beyond expectation every day. The
department service cannot fully satisfy the
overwhelming demand. In addition to the
poorly organized service delivery, insufficient supply of cancer medicines is one major problem. Drugs are not available in variety and as needed.
The paediatric ward is currently in a very
bad shape and desperately looking for
every kind of assistance. Our Society being
young and financially weak hasn’t made a
difference so far but still thanks to our concerted efforts in organizing different fund
raising programs and our partners managed
to donate Birr 81,000 (USD 9,031) worth of
cancer medicines to the hospital in 2008.
Students from various schools in Addis
Ababa actively participated in the program
and raised more than Birr 50,000 (More
than USD 5,000 to be donated to children
with cancer at the Black Lion Hospital). As
per our plan and promise together with
students representatives we handed over
the whole Birr 50,000 in cash and the USD
2,000 worth of cancer medicines donated
by friends of our society on Friday March
20, 2008 to the Black Lion Hospital.
It will take a whole lot of money and time to
restructure the ward in order to offer proper
cancer treatment. Together with the ward
we have been trying to improve the below
standard conditions and to this end we
have developed a project proposal, the first
phase of which is estimated to cost USD
50,000.
Continued on next page ...
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 4
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 4, NUMBER 14
"I LOVE MY HEALTHY ACTIVE CHILDHOOD” Walk Program News (Cont.)
Cancer is preventable and curable if detected at an early stage. In Ethiopia, advocacy work is almost non-existent regarding
cancer. People are not aware about the disease, and it is a gap that has to be filled by
all concerned stakeholders. Government,
physicians, health education promoters and
the media could do much more to make
people aware and to change their behavior
to avoid preventable cancers.
In general, Ethiopia lacks sufficient facility
and personnel to treat cancer patients.
Cancer patients are flocking to the Black
Lion Hospital from all over the country. This
trend must be resolved in the future and a
concerted effort must be geared toward ensuring adequate treatment for cancer patients at their nearest location within their
regions.
Mathiwos Wondu- YeEthiopia Cancer Society
(MWECS) is committing itself to take part in
the national effort of providing amicable
health service to its people by filling the gap
that the government alone is not in a position to provide.
Guidelines focusing on how to prevent cancer and live a healthy good life was developed. Proper briefing was given on how to
use the guidelines and benefit out of it and
finally the guideline was given to each participant of the walk program.
World Child Cancer is dedicated to
improving cancer diagnosis, treatment and
palliative care for children in the developing
world. Over the last 30 years survival rates
for childhood cancer have more than
doubled to around 80%. However, this
success is limited to developed countries
and is available to only one in five of the
world’s children. In developing countries
the survival rate for children with cancer is
typically less than 20%. The result is that
100,000 children die needlessly every year
because of lack of treatment. World Child
Cancer was established in 2007 by an
international team of experts in paediatric
oncology and business determined to
redress this global inequality in cancer care
for children
According to the World Cancer Report, over
two-third of cancers worldwide are due to
known risk factors and potentially avoidable.
These modifiable risk factors include infectious agents, tobacco and alcohol use, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity. Therefore, there is clear scientific evidence that
public health actions that promote healthy
lifestyles could prevent a large proportion of
cancer cases and deaths. However, most
people remain unaware of how they can reduce their risk of developing cancer and
very little has been done to change this by
public health agencies in most developing
countries, including Ethiopia. In this respect,
our Society is convinced that cancer is preventable and curable if detected early and
treated properly.
This wonderful event, the overall objective
of which will be to enhance the awareness of
the Society of cancer in general and childhood cancer in particular, believed to be
very effective in reducing the overall cancer
burden, has been properly reported by the
Ethiopian media.
Wondu Bekele
General Manager
Mathiwos Wondu-YeEthiopia Cancer Society
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 5
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 3, NUME RO 13
TANZANIA ONCOLOGY NURSING
By Sr Mary Haule
Nurse Manager, Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Tanzania
Tanzania is in East Africa and has a population of about 38 million inhabitants. It
has approx. 22500 nurses who are already
registered with the Tanzania Nurses and
Midwife council, and more than 80000
nurses have not been registered.
The Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI)
has 64 trained nurses. About 10 nurses
have attended International Oncology
Nursing Fellowship (IONF) courses and
one nurse has attended a 3 month short
course on oncology, sponsored by the
IAEA in the UK. Three nurses have attended a full diploma course in Palliative
care. The remaining nurses have not attended any specialty courses in oncology
nursing.
Oncology nursing specialty is one of the
new fields in our setup. Up to now we
have no specialised Oncology nurses due
to lack of oncology nursing schools.
Nurses are playing a big role in improving
care to cancer patients and their families.
Nurses are eager to learn more about oncology but due to limited funds, they do
not progress in the field and in most cases
they use their general nursing experience.
The Ocean Road Cancer Institute nursing
division works in collaboration with differ-
Photo above: A facilitator explaining about
nursing care to the participants during the
workshop organized at ORCI.
One of the functions of the nursing division
is to educate the patients, family and public as a whole. During world cancer day
2007, nurses participated fully in cancer
screening activities and health information
to Dar es Salaam clients.
Nurses are playing a big role in improving
care to cancer patients and their families.
ent hospitals and NGO’s so as to improve
care to cancer patients. In order to learn
or understand new technologies in cancer
nursing, nurses have been able to organise workshops by collaborating with international associations such as Nurses from
the Children Hospital Boston, who were
sponsored by Dana Farber.
ORCI nurses are the back bone of care at
the institute, as other nurse’s worldwide in
their hospitals are too. They play a big
role in breast and cervical cancer screening and teaching within and outside the
Institute, and providing some cancer information and counseling.
Photo above: An ORCI nurse, providing health
education to women during World Cancer Day
2007.
In 2009, we commemorated World Cancer
Day with children from the ward and from
the nearby primary school. The event was
marked by cleaning the hospital environment and later holding a picnic with the
children.
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 6
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 3, ISSUE 13
Tanzania Oncology Nursing (Cont.)
by
Sr Mary Haule
Nurse Manager, Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Tanzania
Chemotherapy administration is one of the
biggest activities performed by the nurses.
In order to improve knowledge on chemotherapy administration and safety, we are
collaborating with other nurses world wide
so as to acquire more knowledge and
skills.
There is not enough support for cancer patients while in the wards, as most of them
come from far away. Thus, they are facing
a lot of problems such as psychological and
social issues.
Despite these challenges, the Ocean Road
Cancer Institute is working close with other
cancer institutes in Africa to combat cancer
and we are collaborating in many cancer
control activities.
Effort is being made by the ORCI and Government to train more nurses in oncology
through distance learning or full time
courses in overseas universities/colleges.
Photo above: Nurses Michelle (left) from USA
and Chapchap (right) from ORCI preparing
cytotoxic drugs for patients.
The Majority of our patients are reporting
very late, thus palliative care is the only
option for them. Nurses play a big role in
providing holistic care to patients and
families in hospital and home based palliative care.
Challenges
Nurses are facing challenges due to the
large number of patients in the wards, our
capacity is 103 beds, but now the average
number of patients is 180-200. This causes
difficulties in provision of high quality nursing care to all the patients.
Photo above: ORCI nurse talking to a cancer
patient and her family during a home visit
We are however happy that cancer awareness is increasing in the country that is
probably why the number of patients is increasing.
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 7
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 3, ISSUE 13
Breast Cancer Systemic Therapy:
The Need for More Economically Sustainable Scientific
Strategies in the World
By Ahmed Elzawawy
Summary
The world-wide incidence of cancer is expected to increase to 20 million by 2020.
70% of new cases occur in countries with
5% of the global cancer control resources.
Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in high income, as
well as low and middle income countries
(LMCs). For the leading pharmaceutical
companies, the current market for breast
cancer systemic therapy (BCST) in LMCs is
likely to decline in the future due to increasing costs of novel drugs. Breast cancer provides a strong example for multiple
drug management of solid tumors. Development of economically sustainable scientific strategies for BCST in LMCs could improve affordability of therapy for other
cancers throughout the world.
Examples of recent and ongoing studies
using protocols that could decrease costs
of treatment without compromising outcomes are reviewed. The Win-Win initiative proposed by ICEDOC's (International
Campaign for Establishment and Development of Oncology Centers) Experts in Cancer without Borders starts with small pilot
meetings for oncologists with key stakeholders, including leading pharmaceutical
companies. The participants would develop
a roadmap for actionable strategies for
crafting affordable BCST tailored to regional conditions and the diverse populations of women with breast cancer.
Published in: Breast Care 2008;3:434-438
IAHPC Special Announcement
Grants for the 11th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology
21 - 25 June 2009, in Vienna, Austria
IAHPC is proud to announce that it will provide five scholarships of US$1,500 each to help
individuals from developing countries cover their cost of travel and stay for the next congress of the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS) in Vienna, Austria, 21-25 June
2009. IPOS will waive the congress registration fees of the selected applicants.
Applicants must be living in a developing country, be active members both of IPOS or any
of its affiliates as well as of IAHPC and actively working in palliative care. Applications from
physicians, nurses, psychologists and other disciplines are welcome. Preference will be
given to individuals who have not received an IAHPC grant in the past three years and individuals with accepted poster or oral presentations in the Congress.
Applications are available through the IAHPC website at:
http://www.hospicecare.com/Travellscholars/.
Deadline to apply is April 20th 2009. Results will be announced by April 30th.
Additional information about the IPOS Congress can be found at:
http://www.ipos-society.org/ipos2009/.
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 8
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 3, ISSUE 13
Walking on Onions, Surviving Ovarian Cancer
An African-American Woman’s Cancer Journey
by Mary (“Dicey”) Jackson Scroggins
I am a daydreamer, a reformed worrier, an
optimistic realist, a “what-iffer,” a writer. I
am a mother and a wife, a storyteller and a
writing mentor, a slow but constant reader
and a quick study. I am also an ovarian
cancer survivor. It is the least of who I am
but once attempted to dominate my life, to
occupy a disproportionate share of my
thoughts, my breathing space, my living
quarters.
Placing “I” and “cancer” in the same sentence continues to be disorienting. But I am
an ovarian cancer survivor. I typed the sentence four times, trying to make sure, perhaps, that all words belonged. They do.
The word that makes it possible for me to
type or utter the others is “survivor.” It is
the word that also makes me laugh out loud
“just because.”
Although my cancer journey has been traveled mostly in the United States, a highresource country literally a world apart (in
terms of norms, cultural aspects, resource
levels, and health priorities) from the journey likely experienced on the African continent, it is one focused both on my personal
survival and on something larger—that is,
on health advocacy with an emphasis on the
most needy and the least well served. And
this emphasis, coupled with ancestry, naturally links me to Africa and fosters a concern
for geographically and generationally removed aunts and uncles, cousins and
strangers. This is my story.
In 1996, I had a hysterectomy to remove
fibroid tumors and an ovarian cyst.
Although I’d had a persistent pattern of symptoms—abdominal pressure and slight bloating, weight gain, frequent urination, and abnormal bleeding—that could have suggested
ovarian cancer, it was neither in my awareness bank nor on my gynecologist’s radar
scope. Going into surgery, my greatest
concerns—aside from the general uncertainty associated with major surgery—were
whether I’d have estrogen replacement
therapy afterward and whether my sex life
would be diminished, quantitatively or
qualitatively. (Mention of the latter concern embarrasses my three daughters,
who regularly and with great affection refer to their father—Kwame—and me as
“the perverts.” I am happy to report that
the term of endearment still fits.)
By telephone, six days after surgery, I received a pathology report confirming that I
had had ovarian cancer, the most deadly
gynecologic cancer. My gynecologic oncologist—a specialist trained to stage and
treat cancers of the female reproductive
organs—said that he had good news and
bad news. The good news—an incongruity, I thought, with such a diagnosis—was
that the cancer was detected at Stage IA,
the earliest and most curable stage, which
has over a 90% five-year survival rate.
Even so, at first, I thought he didn’t have a
clear understanding of the concept of
“good” and “news” in the same sentence.
In fact, he did. Stage of the disease at diagnosis is a key indicator of survival; however, only one in four ovarian cancers is
detected at Stage 1, when the cancer is
confined to the ovaries.
I was lucky.
A pattern of reliance on
chance and good fortune has emerged
among women diagnosed at Stage 1. And
one’s survival should not depend so heavily on luck although it is a worthy sidekick
when combined with education, awareness, medical training, appropriate care,
and technology.
Continued on next page ...
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 9
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 3, ISSUE 13
Walking on Onions, Surviving Ovarian Cancer
An African-American Woman’s Cancer Journey (Cont.)
The bad news was that my tumor was Clear
Cell, the most aggressive, least well understood, and most unpredictable type. Now,
clearly, he had a grasp of that “bad news”
thing.
A series of events and acts of love combined
to strengthen me for survival.
For example, after discovering the tumorous
ovary during surgery, my gynecologist wisely
contacted a gynecologic oncologist to complete the surgery.
Next came an outpouring of love, well
wishes, prayers, support, e-mailed jokes, and
healing thoughts from family, friends, acquaintances, and strangers. I cultivated a
survival garden made up of plants that I received, and as the garden flourished, so did
my faith in the future and the power of positive thinking, especially when girded by early
detection and appropriate care.
When I first discussed chemotherapy with my
gynecologic oncologist, he told me about a
patient with a similar diagnosis—Clear Cell
Stage IA. The story began not to sound like
a survival story, so I interrupted him and
asked, “Have any of your patients with a
similar diagnosis lived?” I needed to know. I
couldn’t waste my time or risk my life with a
novice, a pessimist, an inexperienced practitioner, or anyone with a bad track record.
So, thus my chemotherapy began—at least
the decision to have it. And thus it continued
and ended, with laughter and good humor
sprinkled with neuropathy, loss of all sense of
taste, and occasional bouts of constipation
with a capital C. “The chemo made me do it”
became my excuse for any misdeed, misstatement, or awkward moment. I still try
occasionally to use it… with very little success.
My family helped me to laugh—not to forget
to live while struggling to survive—through
surgery, the diagnosis, two hospital stays, six
two-day chemotherapy sessions, weekly
anxious waits for CA-125 tumor marker
results, and the uncertainty and sense of
mortality that is always, always a part of
life after cancer. Fortunately, for me and
for my health, my family is funny; that is,
it is both peculiar and prone to find the
lighter side of anything, even chemotherapy.
My family laughs easily and a lot. It filled
my hospital rooms with laughter that
sometimes pulled me unwillingly and unwittingly into the real world, alive and still
full of joy.
I woke up after surgery to the sound of
two of my five sisters softly arguing over
which soap opera to watch and another espousing the magnificent sleep induced by
anesthetization. (I did not have as much
fun under anesthesia as she had apparently had.) One night, one sister had a
school fund-raiser selling frenzy in my hospital room, and one afternoon, another assembled a prayer circle around my bed. I
imaged a satanic rite was taking place and
was afraid to open my eyes until I heard a
familiar voice. (Drugs, even prescription
ones, and a bunch of chanting strangers
will have that effect on you.)
When I returned home after the surgery,
my daughters, all in their twenties, had
prepared an empty bedroom for my husband—their father—and informed him that
he would not be sleeping with me until I
was better.
He helped them prepare the room and
then ignored the request—completely.
They also placed baby monitors throughout
our home so that I could call them from
any room.
Continued on next page ...
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 10
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 3, ISSUE 13
Walking on Onions, Surviving Ovarian Cancer
An African-American Woman’s Cancer Journey (Cont.)
How can I not survive for a family that had
me walking around a hospital room on onions?
My mother had put onions in my
socks—a variation on a nontraditional home
remedy—to break a persistent high fever.
(The smell of onions, which I hate, filled the
room and baffled the nursing staff.) I have to
survive to see what my family will do next. It
is always with me providing unconditional
support and laugh therapy.
I often remind my daughters that they are
never alone, never without me, because they
are not, will never be. That is inconceivable.
And, no other ovarian cancer patient-survivor
will ever be alone. My thoughts will always
be with them, sending healing vibes,
strengthening them and drawing strength,
speaking out for them, praying for and with
them.
My daughters—who are at increased risk for
ovarian cancer because I am their mother—
accuse me of advertising, telling anyone who
will listen that I am an ovarian cancer survivor. I say I’m just giving a healthy, activist,
joy-filled face to the disease, especially for
African-American women and other women of
color, who were often first told that they don’t
have to worry about ovarian cancer because
they don’t get it and then confronted with the
fact that, when they do, they are more likely
to die from it. Along with family and friends,
the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance—an umbrella organization of groups and individuals
united in a movement to overcome ovarian
cancer—became my after-chemo lifeline. I
intend to be that for other women, particularly the most needy and the least well
served, and thus co-founded In My Sister’s
Care (with Renae Plummer, Nyrvah Richard,
and LaTrisha Wilson), an organization dedicated to medical equity and eliminating health
disparities.
The formation of a network of advocacy
organizations throughout Africa, actively
and collaboratively working together, can
change the cancer landscape. I intend to
try to assist in making such a network a
reality and in helping to usher in an era of
greater hope, enhanced quality of life, and
improved survival.
As I stand poised to celebrate my 13th
Survival Anniversary, with a life altered
but still joy filled, I also stand ready to
share the challenge of advocacy group
and network formation.
I am a daydreamer, still.
Editors’s note:
Mary Scroggins will be chairing the
“Creating an African advocacy network”
session at the AORTIC 2009 conference.
Website: www.aortic2009.org
E-mail: [email protected]
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 11
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 3, ISSUE 13
EGYPT: RISING COSTS OF CARE
The National Cancer Institute of Egypt is the largest comprehensive cancer centre in the
South and East Mediterranean region. Ahmed M. Elzawawy, MD, President of the International Campaign for Establishment and Development of Oncology Centres (ICEDOC) and
Director of the South and East Mediterranean College of Oncology (SEMCO) shares a snapshot of the state of cancer care in his country.
AN&F: What are the most prevalent cancers in your region?
Dr Elzawawy: Egypt (78 million inhabitants) is classified as a country of low-middle income, and countries designated as such have the highest population of patients with cancer. Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular diseases. The three
most common cancers encountered in Egypt are urinary bladder cancer in men, breast
cancer in women, and lymphoma and leukemia in children.
AN&F: What are some of the biggest challenges to providing cancer care in
Egypt?
Dr Elzawawy: Egypt has an increasing number of patients with cancer due to population
growth and aging: advances in detection, treatment, and survival: and epidemiologic
transition and increasing chronic diseases. Egyptian patients with cancer usually present
at a relatively advanced stage in their disease, which has a negative effect on treatment
results. However, the last 15 years have seen improvement in different regions of patients. The percentage of patients who are candidates for curative treatment, with its increasing costs, are increasing rapidly. This stimulates enormously an increase in the quantity and quality of cancer services and centres developed in the last 10 years.
A limited health care budget that depends on the governmental budget, insurance, donations, and private sector funding.
Challenges that we must address in the immediate future are the rising cost of chemotherapy and coping with technological advances in research, prevention, and education.
AN&F: How are ASCO and local organisations working to address these challenges?
Dr Elzawawy: First, with continuing cancer education programmes. At present, there is co
-operation between ASCO and SEMCO in holding regional ASCO-SEMCO Educational conferences. Multi-disciplinary Cancer Management Courses (MCMC), and Advanced Cancer
Courses.
Second, with scientific co-operation and collaboration in fields of research, SEMCO has
launched an initiative to enhance publication in international peer reviewed journals for
professionals in different cancer specialties in the region.
Third, with the development of short-term visiting residences and fellowships with colleagues from Egypt and the South and East Mediterranean regions who serve in various
health care sectors.
There is also ongoing co-operation between ASCO, as the largest international cancer society, ICEDOC’s Experts in Cancer Without Borders, and SEMCO.
Source: ASCO News & Forum: 25
(Prof Elzawawy is also Vice-President of AORTIC, North Africa).
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 12
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 3, ISSUE 13
Cancer in Africa needs a local approach
Science Development Network
Twalib Ngoma
23 July 2008 | EN | FR
Cancer care in Africa faces the same
challenges as general healthcare, but
also needs local data and targeted solutions, says Twalib Ngoma.
African countries face many challenges
when providing health services in general,
and care of cancer patients in particular.
Financial constraints are one obvious barrier. But many others exist, and need to be
understood by anyone seeking to improve
the situation.
For example, all African countries suffer
from insufficient scientific and epidemiological information (required to guide resource
planning), as well as a shortage of professionals trained to provide the necessary
clinical care.
strategic planning.
On top of all this, African
countries face the fact
that resources are often
allocated based on bureaucratic procedures or
political goals, rather than
coherent public health Photo: A Nigerian girl
with
Burkitt's
lympolicy.
phoma
Flickr/MikeBlyth
This makes it virtually impossible for patients –
particularly cancer patients — to receive appropriate care in a timely fashion, as major
components of healthcare infrastructure, as
well as the resources needed to implement
improved care, are lacking.
Appreciating the problem
In addition, many face competing health
and other social priorities, as well as political insecurity and even wars, which can
each divert attention from long-term
healthcare issues. Finally, social and cultural factors frequently obstruct the timely
and effective delivery of care.
All these hurdles apply across the board to
healthcare. In addition, however, others
are specific to cancer. In particular, misconceptions about cancer can impede efforts aimed at early detection and make
patients reluctant or unwilling to seek care
when they notice early symptoms.
Inadequate infrastructure
Overburdened and underfunded healthcare
systems are at the root of many of the
health problems in Africa. Inefficient health
management, together with disorganised
governmental structures, further contribute
to the financial burdens facing healthcare.
As a result, financial allocations for healthcare are mostly driven by crisis management rather than long- or even mid-term
An additional problem is that the developed
world has demonstrated that most cancers
are curable if detected and treated in the
early stages. But this does not apply in Africa, where about 80 per cent of all cancer
patients have advanced-staged disease when
they first see a doctor.
Furthermore, in many African countries, cancer is not an explicit priority for spending on
healthcare, and cancer awareness is very
low. To tackle cancer, African politicians
must recognise that the disease is a major
public health issue.
One reason that the challenge of cancer in
Africa is underappreciated is the lack of
population-based incidence and mortality
data.
Too much reliance is placed on data from the
West. These data are often not useful when
trying to generate compelling evidencebased guidance on how cancer in African
countries can best be addressed.
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
A OR T IC NEWS
PAGE 22
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Cancer in Africa needs a local approach (Cont.)
Healthcare brain drain
Recruiting, training and retaining healthcare Assessing needs is essential for tailoring
professionals are another problem. Qualified treatment to specific healthcare settings.
physicians, nurses, and allied healthcare Importantly, most cancers seen in Africa
personnel are scarce in Africa, partly be- have different causes, epidemiology and
cause there are insufficient funds to fully biological behaviour compared with those
equip hospitals and provide either competi- seen in the western world. So Africa cannot
just extrapolate knowledge and experience
tive salaries or opportunities for career develop- For example, more than 20 from the West.
ment.
African countries do not
Instead, Africa needs local,
have any radiotherapy treatThe situation is exacer- ment facilities, despite their effective and sustainable
bated when healthcare pro- important role in cancer research. If this research is
not relevant to rich counfessionals migrate from ru- treatment.
tries, it may be unrealistic
ral to urban areas, move
to
expect
them
to
finance it.
from public to private health sectors, and
emigrate from Africa to richer countries. Africa has to come up with solutions to ad- Positive outlook
dress this brain drain if it is to improve can- Researchers must also remember that,
since African countries have different levels
cer services in the continent
Even those who do take on appointments of resources, populations, prevalence of discan become frustrated and disenchanted ease and other factors, each country will
when the infrastructure they need to carry require different solutions for the same canout their work is lacking. For example, more cer problems.
than 20 African countries do not have any
radiotherapy treatment facilities, despite The good news is that the commonest cancers in Africa are caused by viruses, against
their important role in cancer treatment.
which new interventions — namely vaccines
— are being developed. But the high costs
Africa-specific research needed
of these vaccines mean that most African
Three types of research — basic, epidemicountries cannot afford to buy them.
ologic and interventional — are relevant to
caring for cancer patients, and each can, at
least in principle, be carried out in Africa.
Yet research is still considered a luxury in
many African countries.
Africa needs concerted efforts by the donor
and international community to make these
vaccines accessible to those Africans who
need them most.
For epidemiological research, Africa needs
cancer data registries, whether these are
broad regional and national cancer registries, or more limited study-specific registries intended to measure the outcomes and
effects of specific interventions.
If the obstacles outlined above were to be
properly addressed, Africa could improve its
cancer services, even without much additional funding from the rest of the world.
Africa also requires better 'needs assessments' in both the general and the medical
communities, asking the public and healthcare professionals respectively what their
needs are, and what problems they face.
Twalib Ngoma is Executive Director
of the Ocean Road Cancer Institute,
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
& President of AORTIC.
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
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A OR T IC NEWS
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Psycho-Social Oncology Care in Africa?
Africa has many challenges in terms of material resources and practical frustrations.
The people of Africa, in general, are accustomed to struggle and hardship. They often
tell of their worries and burdens in story and
song – who is there to listen to the stories,
to share the tales of pain and disappointment, or to share the excitement of hope?
Developed Countries offer specialised training courses in aspects of psycho-social oncology for professionals. This is not the
case in Africa.
Very few Social Work
Schools in South Africa offer undergraduate
courses in coping with chronic conditions
such as cancer, or equip students to assist
with loss and grief.
The role of Listener, Companion and Counsellor may be played by a social worker,
pastoral care worker or psychologist. These
aspects of cancer care are essential and
should be included when considering medical treatment for the patient as a Whole Person, not simply a body requiring investigations or interventions.
The South African Oncology Social Work Association seeks to promote the psycho-social
No longer do social workers simply attend to
very real practical needs, but they have a
range of additional skills that fit well into oncology settings:
∗
Experienced practitioners are able to
provide supportive spaces where patients and families can talk about their
emotions, and prepare for what lies
ahead.
∗
The Oncology Social Worker can assist
medical colleagues with a better understanding of patients’ needs and fears,
at various stages in the treatment or
illness process.
∗
Staff can be assisted to cope with the
despair and frustration they face, in order to prevent burnout or compassion
fatigue.
care of people with cancer, their families and
care givers, through educating and training professionals in the field, and encouraging networking and the sharing of expertise wherever there
is an opportunity.
(For more information about the S A Oncology
Social Work Association, contact Clare Manicom,
National Chairperson at:
[email protected] or
WHO offers valuable free training resource in 26 languages
Supercourse is a repository of lectures on global health and prevention designed to improve
the teaching of prevention. Supercourse has a network of over 64,000 scientists in 174
countries who are sharing for free a library of 3,623 lectures in 26 languages. The Supercourse has been produced at the World Health Organization Collaborating Center University
of Pittsburgh, with core developers Ronald LaPorte, Ph.D., Faina Linkov, Ph.D., Mita
Lovalekar, M.D., Ph.D. and Eugene Shubnikov M.D.
For more information please contact: [email protected]
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 15
.
V OLUME 1 3, ISSUE 13
A OR T IC NEWS
FIVE-COUNTRY INITIATIVE UNDER WAY TO ADVANCE
CANCER CONTROL AND ADVOCACY IN AFRICA
Africa's increasing cancer burden underscores the need to redouble global efforts
that advance cancer control and heighten
awareness and advocacy in the region. The
American Cancer Society is pleased to work
with key partners like the African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer to
advance critical cancer control and advocacy
goals outlined in a two-year grant it received
from the Oracle Corporation. The grantfunded Africa Cancer Information and Advocacy Initiative is designed to expand evidence, improve planning, and promote action for cancer control in Ghana, Nigeria,
Senegal, South Africa, and Tanzania. At the
foundation of the Initiative is researching
intervention best practices and cancerrelated perceptions that will inform training,
grants, and advocacy opportunities to mobilize cancer civil society in the countries engaged. The ultimate goal of the Initiative is
to increase public awareness of cancer and
reduce the overall burden of disease in Africa.
As part of this Initiative, there will be trainings held in Accra, Ghana, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. These trainings will help
voluntary organizations from the five countries improve their capacity to plan and implement cancer control initiatives such as
information
activities.
dissemination
and
advocacy
These trainings are being informed by cancer control assessments and research on
knowledge, attitudes, and practices that
are being conducted in the target countries.
To date, key interviews or focus group discussions have been held with close to 100
stakeholders. In addition, an advisory committee comprised of experts in nonprofit
leadership and management, public health,
research, oncology, advocacy and communications, is providing strategic support and
counsel
for
this
initiative.
The training in Accra, Ghana, took place
from March 26-29, 2009, and focussed on
sharing global evidence and emerging national or regional cancer control data, presenting findings from stakeholder research,
and facilitating discussions between organizations to plan collaborative activities. The
training in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, will
take place in advance of the AORTIC conference in November and will focus on cancer advocacy, project reports and media
outreach. For more information about this
initiative, please contact Ann McMikel at the
American
Cancer
Society
at
[email protected]
WE WELCOME OUR NEW MEMBERS!
Charles A Adisa— Nigeria
Clare Manicom—South Africa
George J Hammons— USA
Join now and enjoy the benefits of being a member of AORTIC:
∗
∗
∗
∗
The right to vote
Reduced registration fees for AORTIC’s biennial conference
Access to cancer news alerts such us conferences and training opportunities
Access to AORTIC’s quarterly newsletter
To join please send an e-mail to [email protected] and we will send you the application
forms or alternatively visit www.aortic.org.
We look forward to welcoming you to our organisation.
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 10
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 3, ISSUE 13
Maximize Life with The Max Foundation’s Annual Art Project
Since 2006, The Max Foundation has organized an Annual Art Project for people living
with blood cancer or rare cancer, their caregivers and local patient support groups
around the world. Through this project we
aim to:
Empower participants by helping them
share their personal journey with cancer
Facilitate peer-to-peer support to reenergize patients
Help patients become part of a global
network of survivors
Increase awareness of cancer in local
communities and reduce cancer-related
stigma
Recognize the abundant talent amongst
the patients and caregivers.
∗
∗
∗
∗
∗
Past participants have reported that the contest touched them immensely by giving them
the chance to think beyond their illness and
feel empowered to make a difference in their
communities. This enthusiasm has been conveyed throughout the artwork and by the increasing participation worldwide.
With over 500 entries from 11 countries in
2008, we are hoping for a greater representation of artworks from Africa this year, in
search of our first regional winner from the
African continent.
In 2009 there will be 4 Regional Awards: Asia,
Africa, Europe, Americas. This year’s theme is
“Maximize Life”. We would like participants to
depict how a cancer diagnosis has helped
people living with blood cancer or rare cancers, and those close to them, live their
lives to the maximum.
The artists who win the regional categories
will be awarded $250 USD. If the winner is
affiliated to a local patient support group,
the affiliated patient group will receive a
grant of $1,000 USD to support local patient group initiatives.
Additionally, all entries will be considered
for a worldwide Holiday Card category. with
a prize of $250 USD for the piece chosen
as the 2009 The Max Foundation’s Holiday
Card.
Any medium will be considered and no
previous art experience is necessary.
Please send all artwork electronically or
through postal mail to the addresses below by August 1st, 2009. Please include
name of artist, patient group (if applicable), address, phone number, email address and title of the artwork on each submission.
Please send submissions to:
The Max Foundation
110 W. Dayton St. Suite 205
Edmonds, WA 98020
USA
To send submissions via email or for more
information please contact:
[email protected]
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
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Tobacco Control Training Workshop Focuses on Policy and
Advocacy Promotion for Anglophone Africa
In November 2008, international leaders in
cancer and tobacco control announced the
launch of the Africa Tobacco Control Regional Initiative (ATCRI), an unprecedented
multinational effort to promote more aggressive tobacco control measures across
sub-Saharan Africa. The effort is the first
tobacco control programme of its kind on
the continent that will be planned by Africans involving fellow Africans who are committed to strengthening the tobacco control
movement, which is still in its early stages
in most African countries. ATCRI seeks to
promote the adoption, implementation and
enforcement of effective in-country tobacco
control policies, legislation and programmes. ATCRI had its first training on
tobacco control in Africa at the Milkin Hotel
in Accra, Ghana from 17 - 20, Feb, 2009.
The overall objective of the meeting was to
strengthen the knowledge base of tobacco
control advocates and empower them to
initiate actions to advance effective tobacco
control policies in their countries. Core issues relating to challenges of tobacco control in Africa were discussed during the
workshop. Tobacco control advocates,
health practitioners, government delegates,
and journalists with interest in health and
development issues rallied to seek solutions to the emerging tobacco epidemic
that has plagued the continent for too long.
Fourteen delegates from twelve African
countries participated in the training programme. The delegates were from West,
East, Central and Southern Africa. The
workshop consisted of a blend of didactic
lectures and facilitation methods with presentations on the objectives of ATCRI,
health effects of tobacco, the epidemiology
of tobacco on the African continent, the
Framework Convention on Tobacco Control
(FCTC), media involvement in tobacco control advocacy, key issues in policy and advocacy among other issues. There were
also group practical sessions in which advocates worked together to share and proffer
solutions to peculiar challenges with the
implementation of the FCTC in their
countries.
ATCRI is supported by Cancer Research
U.K and the American Cancer Society and
is being hosted by Environmental Rights
Action/ Friends of the Earth Nigeria (ERA/
FoEN). For more information, visit the ATCRI website at www.atcri.org.
Tobacco products are products made entirely or partly of leaf tobacco as raw
material, which are intended to be smoked, sucked, chewed or snuffed. All
contain the highly addictive psychoactive ingredient, nicotine.
Tobacco use is one of the main risk factors for a number of chronic diseases,
including cancer, lung diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Despite this, it is common
throughout the world. A number of countries have legislation restricting tobacco advertising, and regulating who can buy and use tobacco products, and where people can smoke.
- WHO
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
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CANCER CARE TREATMENT IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
THE CHALLENGES
Cancer is a low priority in the developing
world where health services are generally
set up to treat infectious diseases, which
are the greatest burden, rather than to
manage chronic conditions. A 2002 survey
by the World Health Organization (WHO)
of 167 countries showed that less than half
– and only 15% in sub-Saharan Africa –
had cancer policies or plans in place. And
everywhere except Europe and the Americas implementation of such plans as did
exist was poor, with less than a third of
countries in Africa and less than half in
South-East Asia having national guidelines
for prevention and management of cancer
(27).
population, while coverage in Asia and
Latin America is 7% and 10% respectively.
Other challenges in responding to the cancer epidemic include:
∗
Only 5% of global resources for cancer are
spent in the developing world (28).
Most countries have very poor understanding of the nature and extent of the problem they face, since precious few maintain
registers of cancer patients or have surveillance and epidemiological research programmes in place to guide decisionmaking. In sub-Saharan Africa, for example, cancer registries cover only 8% of the
Poor health infrastructure. Though the
picture varies considerably from one
county to another, many people in the
developing world – especially those
living in remote rural areas -- have
limited access to clinics and health
centre, and the number of doctors and
nurses to serve populations is woefully
inadequate (see table 1). There are
acute shortages of laboratory facilities,
equipment and technicians to provide
screening programmes; and radiotherapy services for treating cancers fall
far short of need, with some African
countries lacking such services altogether.
Table 1: Health professionals per 100,000 people
in selected countries
TABLE 1
COUNTRY
DOCTORS
NURSES
Lesotho
5
62.6
Malawi
2
56.4
Mozambique
2.6
20
South Africa2
74.3
393
Rwanda
5
42
Sierra Leone
3
23
USA
247
901
UK
222
1,170
20
100
WHO minimum
Table 1: Source: World Development Indicators, 2007, World Bank. World Health Report 2006
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
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CANCER CARE TREATMENT IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
(Cont.)
∗ Scarcity of specialist skills. Ethiopia, for
instance, had only one oncologist for a
population of 60 million in 2005, and
Cambodia only one haematologist (a specialist in blood disorders) in 2006 (31).
Everywhere, pathologists able to provide
accurate diagnoses and staging of cancers
are
in
short
supply.
* The high cost of drugs and diagnostics.
Cancer therapies, especially the newer
and more effective drugs, can be extremely expensive. These therapies are
currently beyond the reach of public
health systems in low- and middleincome countries, and are unaffordable to
all but the very richest individuals in
these countries. The high cost of cancer
drugs and diagnostics is one of the most
important reasons why less than half of
those in need of cancer treatment in the
developing world have access to it (32).
To date, there have been only small and
very limited efforts to make these lifesaving therapies available, through drug access initiatives similar to those that have
* The need for personalised treatment
regimens and long-term follow-up of
patients, which may require considerable reorientation of health services,
education of health staff, and changes
in
how
records
are
kept.
* Lack of awareness and knowledge
about cancer among the general public. People need education to encourage them to go for screening if available, to seek timely treatment for
signs and symptoms, and to overcome
fear and stigma associated with the
disease. The healthcare community
also needs to be educated about cancer, as many health workers have little knowledge or experience of working with this and other chronic diseases.
Source: Extract from Axios International
(2009). Issues Paper: Cancer Treatment
and Care In Developing Countries.
Global burden of cancer
Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. The disease accounted for 7.4 million deaths
(or around 13% of all deaths worldwide) in 2004. The main types of cancer leading to overall cancer mortality each year are:
∗
∗
∗
∗
∗
lung (1.3 million deaths/year)
stomach (803 000 deaths)
colorectal (639 000 deaths)
liver (610 000 deaths)
breast (519 000 deaths)
More than 70% of all cancer deaths occurred in low- and middle-income countries. Deaths
from cancer worldwide are projected to continue rising, with an estimated 12 million deaths
in 2030.
- WHO
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
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CANCER INSTITUTE PROFILE
The Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI)
As a renowned tertiary care centre, it accepts
in Dar es Salaam was established as the 3000 inpatients and 10 000 outpatients each
National Cancer Institute for Tanzania by year from all over Tanzania and neighbouring
countries such as Malawi, Zambia and the Dean Act of Parliament in 1996.
mocratic Republic of Congo.
It is the only specialised cancer centre in
the country that offers cancer treatment, In 2006, following the endorsement of recomtraining, research, surveillance and can- mendations from the IAEA Programme of Action
cer prevention. Since its establishment, for Cancer Therapy (PACT) for strengthening
ORCI was designated as the National Co- cancer control capabilities by the government of
ordinator for Cancer Control in Tanzania Tanzania, the ORCI formed a secretariat for a
and given a mandate to formulate and Steering Committee appointed by the Minister
ensure the development of cancer control of Health. The main tasks of the steering committee are to focus on formulating and
actions in Tanzania.
strengthening each component of national canDuring its 10 years of existence, the cer control system and develop action plans for
ORCI has been a leader in terms of can- the National Cancer Control programme.
cer control in Tanzania, implementing actions in strategic areas such as cancer
prevention, early detection, cancer treatment, human resources development,
research, surveillance, information and
palliative care through the referral system of the Ministry of Health of Tanzania.
The Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI)
Currently ORCI has 160 beds and 200
staff members including 5 senior professionals with Academic status with the
Muhimbili University of Health and Allied
Sciences.
Photo: Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI)
UICC CERVICAL CANCER INITIATIVE
The rapidly changing landscape of cervical cancer prevention and control demands the development of comprehensive, effective and appropriate strategies to support continuing
global and country-level efforts.
The UICC cervical cancer initiative advisory group, chaired by Professor
Harald zur Hausen, 2008 Nobel Prize recipient (above), has identified the
following priorities for action: a pilot project in a developing country, professional education, advocacy, and public information. Over the coming
four years, UICC will
∗ pilot a comprehensive prevention project with partners in Tanzania and
Nicaragua;
∗ provide educational resources and training to health professionals and
Prof Harald Zur
Hausen
policymakers
∗ raise awareness through public information, education and campaigns; and
∗ advocate for affordable and appropriate cervical cancer prevention and control.
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
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A OR T IC NEWS
AORTIC 2009 CONFERENCE
V OLUME 1 3, ISSUE 13
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CONFERENCES
15th UICC
Reach to Recovery
International Breast Cancer Support Conference
May 13 to 15, 2009 "Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre", Brisbane, Australia
In May 2009, delegates from around the world will converge on Brisbane, Australia,
for the 15th UICC Reach to Recovery International Breast Cancer Support Conference.
The conference will connect women from around the world to focus on supportive care
for those diagnosed with breast cancer. Particular emphasis will be given to the key
areas of survivorship, capacity building, and peer support. It will be the first truly
global forum for women affected by breast cancer.
If you or your colleagues or friends have a special interest in breast cancer supportive
care, then this conference is for you.
The conference theme is "One Journey, Many People". The dates are 13-15 May 2009.
International speakers, world-class programme
The conference features an innovative and vibrant programme of international speakers, unique case studies, and detailed presentations and workshops.
Our world-class keynote speakers include Dr Annette Stanton from the UCLA's Jonsson
Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Ann Steyn, president of Reach to Recovery International, and Mollie Williams, director of community health programmes for Susan G
Komen for the Cure.
Pre-conference workshops and training will include international collaborations with
organizations such as the Lance Armstrong Foundation.
View the full conference programme on the conference website:
http://www.cancerqld.org.au/reachtorecovery2009/home.html
Join in a Celebration of Hope!
The Celebration of Hope is a two-week festival of events planned around the conference. The Celebration of Hope will showcase community support for breast cancer and
includes dragon boating, a community fun-run with 10,000 participants, and a Harley
Davidson motorcycle adventure from Brisbane to Sydney.
The festival will harness a uniquely Australian spirit of adventure, inspiring delegates
to embrace new ideas for the future. Delegates will get a taste of the diverse environment that characterizes the Australian way of life, enjoying the chance to bond with
other women in a journey of exploration and discovery.
..
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
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Grants for the 11th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology,
21 - 25 June 2009, in Vienna, Austria.
The International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care (IAHPC) is proud to announce
that it will provide five scholarships of US$1,500 each to help individuals from developing
countries cover their cost of travel and stay for the next congress of the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS) in Vienna, Austria, 21-25 June 2009. IPOS will waive the congress registration fees of the selected applicants.
Applicants must be living in a developing country, be active members both of IPOS or any
of its affiliates as well as of IAHPC and actively working in palliative care. Applications from
physicians, nurses, psychologists and other disciplines are welcome. Preference will be
given to individuals who have not received an IAHPC grant in the past three years and individuals with accepted poster or oral presentations in the Congress.
Applications are available through the IAHPC website at http://www.hospicecare.com/
Travellscholars/. When applicable, please send proof of acceptance of the poster or oral
presentation, along with a copy of your current CV.
Deadline to apply is April 20th 2009. Results will be announced by April 30th.
Additional information about the IPOS Congress can be found at:
http://www.ipos-society.org/ipos2009/.
SEMCO-ASCO Palliative integrated
Oncology advanced EPEC-O course and Conference
15-17 April, 2009 ,Cairo, Egypt
The Course is accredited by the University of California , and it is a combined
SEMCO-ASCO Educational meeting.
Please visit www.semco-oncology.info & www.icedoc.org regularly for updates.
South and East Mediterranean College of Oncology (SEMCO) is a non governmental and
non profit initiative that aims at the enhancement of Professional and public education in all
fields of cancer and relevant researches in the region of South and East Mediterranean.
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15th UICC
Reach to Recovery
International Breast Cancer Support Conference May 13 to 15, 2009 - Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, Brisbane, Australia
Join a Riverlife Adventure!
All conference delegates are invited to join in our Adventure Workshops on the spectacular Brisbane River, to be held on the first afternoon of the conference. Your adventure will begin with a short boat
ride down the Brisbane River to our destination point, Riverlife, at
Log on to www.qldcancer.com.au/reachtorecovery2009/conference/adventure.html to
choose an adventure that suits you!
Message Stick Relay – the Journey of Hope continues!
The Message Stick has found its way from Lisbon, in Portugal, to Nigeria and Ghana, in Africa, increasing community awareness of breast cancer on its journey.
In Portugal, more than 200 breast cancer survivors, their family
members and friends gathered to celebrate the Message Stick’s
Journey of Hope.
"I think that this event and the Message Stick Relay will be spoken
of for some time... to call attention to survivorship and the fight
against breast cancer.” Maria Matos - Movimento Vencer e Viver,
Lisbon, Portugal
Log on to join the at: www.themessagestick.com/
Pink Ribbon Day Firebirds Event
Enjoy a world-class sporting contest on Monday May 11 when the Queensland Firebirds
netball team takes on rival team, the West Coast Fever. As a conference delegate, you’re
eligible for a 15 per cent discount on ticket prices! In recognition of breast cancer survivors
gathered for the conference, the game will be a special Pink Ribbon Day event.
Don’t miss out – buy your tickets online at:
www.qldcancer.com.au/reachtorecovery2009/celebration_of_hope_Netball.html
One Journey, Many People
The 15th UICC Reach to Recovery International Breast Cancer Support Conference will
connect women from around the world to focus on survivorship, capacity building, and
peer support. It will be the first global forum for women affected by breast cancer.
For more information please visit: www.reachtorecovery2009.org
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PUBLICATIONS
Description
The African Journal of Cancer / Le Journal africain du cancer (JAC), established under the
auspices of the association Afrocancer is an
international journal of scientific and medical
information and education on cancer. It aims
to foster and promote tumoral pathology control in the
African continent.
The journal publishes both basic and clinical
research works, mainly in French but equally
in English. It presents and analyzes individual
and collective prevention strategies, as well
as medical and therapeutic approaches from
diagnosis
to palliative care.
The JAC opens up to all aspects of oncology from epidemiology to biotechnological innovations, and human, social and environmental sciences - and highlights the regional
disparities, cultural influences and socioeconomic realities on the disease control in
Africa. In a didactic way, the journal presents
information on cancer in Africa to make them
profitable
to
its
readers.
Being a real point of exchange to build
bridges of cooperation between actors from
the North and South, the journal aims to
meet, together, the numerous cancer challenges.
The African Journal of Cancer (JAC)
publishes original articles, synthesis articles (focused articles and general reviews) and clinical cases. The texts must
be written in French and include a summary in English.
The editors reserve, however, the right to
publish some of the works issued from
non-French speaking countries directly in
English. The manuscripts submitted to the
JAC are not allowed to have been published or have been sent at the same time
to another medical journal. Manuscripts
received are subject to an evaluation
(refereeing) by two independent readers
who agree to return the text and their
comments within 30 days. The comments
are collected by the editor, who in turn
forwards them to the
authors.
Sending manuscripts
Manuscripts should be sent directly to the
editor in chief, Dr Adama Ly, at:
[email protected]
Please download full authors' instructions at:
www.springer.com/12558/
- AORTIC NEWS, The Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
PAGE 27
A OR T IC NEWS
V OLUME 1 3, ISSUE 13
PUBLICATIONS
Anticancer Therapeutics
Written by Sotiris Missailidis (Winner of the 2008 Mike Price Fellowship)
ISBN13: 9780470723036
ISBN10: 0470723033
Anticancer Therapeutics provides a comprehensive overview of the
wealth of information now available in this important and fast-moving
subject. The book provides a clear introduction to the area, with an
overview of the various drug design and development approaches for
cancer therapeutics and their progress in today’s multidisciplinary approach to cancer treatment.
Getting Started: Guidelines for those starting a hospice and
palliative care program
Written by Derek Doyle
ISBN: 0-9758525-7-4
This new edition is revised, has additional chapters and is also now available in a pdf file for those who wish to download and print it.
The book may be downloaded from:
www.hospicecare.com/gs/book/start.htm
Squamous Cancer of the Oesophagus in Africa
Written by Alaistair Sammon
The cause of cancer of the oesophagus in Africa has often been seen as
a mystery. Alastair Sammon reviews the evidence at www.scoafrica.org
and explores the well-known associations with maize and poverty. He
argues that the evidence is clear and the causal agents identifiable.
At www.scoafrica.org there is a free pdf download of his book Squamous
Cancer of the Oesophagus in Africa and a forum where you can add your
own information and views on the subject.
Alastair worked for many years in Transkei, South Africa, one of the world’s hotspots for
oesophageal cancer. He hopes to stimulate debate, encourage research, and through a
common understanding of the causes of the disease, make it possible to develop ways of
prevention.
- AORTIC NEWS, Pulse of Cancer Care in Africa
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